How Can I Structure a Singing Lesson?

VocalCoachKen April 29, 2012 0

I am very a beginner vocal coach, and your material has helped me a lot. I do some amateur teaching with my local workship team, but now some of them want something private.

How do I organize a private lesson?  I know to do a diagnosis test, (r) scale, and from there i can tell alot from their voices, i.e breathiness etc. But what else should I include?

Thank you very much

-Michael

 

Hey Michael,
Teaching can be such a wonderful and fun experience. I can’t even express how much I enjoy it personally.

I’ve gotten to the point that I’ve taught long enough that I don’t have a whole lot of structure to my teaching… it’s more based on what a student needs.

But personally, I spend half a lesson or more on warm ups (doing scales and having students mimicking sounds), and then spend the remainder of the lesson applying what we’ve learned. Doing this helps to allow me to makes sure certain elements of their voice are in the best place for success before we move onto singing a song.

Some of the things I listen for and am looking to balance in warm ups include, but aren’t limited to: air flow, resonance space, cord closure, pressure, tension in the throat or tongue, etc. I am also actively looking to help them establish a mix voice, helping them transition between chest and head in a strong, but effortless way.

I’ve outlined quite a bit of what I think should be going on with a lot of these aspects on both SingingTipsBlog.com and AskaVocalCoach.com.

You certainly don’t have to get this in depth with your singers at first. Heck, you’d probably be doing great just to help them a great service just to help them shed tension and maintain a steady flow of air.

Just don’t feel like you have to treat every student the same way because no two singers are exactly alike. Unlike piano where we all start learning where middle C is, we’ve all been using our voices for years, so our starting points aren’t going to be the same. So, work with your students accordingly.

I hope this helps, and if you’d like more guidance in the future or maybe a skype lesson or two where I can help give you some guidance, feel free to shoot me an email and we’ll go from there.

Best of luck with your teaching!

~ Vocal Coach Ken Taylor